Agama lionotus East African Rainbow Lizard
Some other names for this species:
Kenyan Rock Agama
Near Tsavo West National Park, KenyaJuly 8, 2000
East African Rainbow Lizard (Agama lionotus)
These agamas were probably the most visible lizards in Kenya, though some skinks and geckos may have been more common. They're a social species, often found in groups. This is a tiny little baby one that visited us on a lunch stop off the road between Nairobi and Tsavo.
Samburu Intrepids tented camp, poolside, Samburu National Reserve, KenyaJuly 14, 2000
East African Rainbow Lizard (Agama lionotus) East African Rainbow Lizard (Agama lionotus)
A gregarious group of agamas held court at poolside at the Samburu Intrepids tented camp. The full-grown females are somewhat smaller than the males, and have light green flecks on their heads. Maybe you can get a hint of this from the foreground lizard. The males are often colored similarly to the females, though without the green flecks, such as the larger background lizard here.
Lake Nakuru National Park, KenyaJuly 16, 2000
East African Rainbow Lizard (Agama lionotus)
I originally thought this agama might be a different species, since it didn't look like an adult male or an adult female. The red spots near the hind leg seemed a distinguishing mark. However, Dr. Robert Drewes identified it as Agama agama lionotus, probably a sub-dominant male. (A. a. lionotus was later elevated to full species status.)
Lake Nakuru National Park, KenyaJuly 16, 2000
East African Rainbow Lizard (Agama lionotus)
These lizards are best known for the shockingly bright colors sometimes adopted by the dominant males. Remarkably, a brownish spotted male such as the poolside fellow from Samburu above can turn into one of these garish eyecatchers in just a few minutes.
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