Anolis trachyderma Common Forest Anole
Some other names for this species:
Roughskin Anole
Madre Selva Biological Station, Loreto, PeruJanuary 13, 2013
Common Forest Anole (Anolis trachyderma)
True to its English name, I saw more of these lizards sleeping on leaves and twigs at night than any other type of lizard.

Here is a complete list of the herps I saw in the wild on my 2013 MT Amazon Expeditions trip.

Madre Selva Biological Station, Loreto, PeruJanuary 16, 2013
Common Forest Anole (Anolis trachyderma)
During the day, these anoles are typically seen in the leaf litter or otherwise very low to the ground.
Madre Selva Biological Station, Loreto, PeruJanuary 16, 2013
Common Forest Anole (Anolis trachyderma)
I don't understand the survival value of sleeping in plain sight on a flat leaf, but perhaps this allows the anole to feel vibrations through the leaf when nocturnal predators approach. It certainly doesn't always work, though.
Santa Cruz Forest Reserve, Loreto, PeruJanuary 20, 2013
Common Forest Anole (Anolis trachyderma)
This was the most boldly-patterned individual I saw during the day. Not that I saw all that many; unlike in Florida or the Caribbean, where you can't sneeze without frightening a few anoles, in Amazonia they are not so abundant, or at least not so easy to find. I did well to see three or four on a hike.
Santa Cruz Forest Reserve, Loreto, PeruJanuary 21, 2013
Common Forest Anole (Anolis trachyderma)
Yet another night-leaf-sleeper, though this one seems to have completely woken up before this photo was taken, and is ready to make its escape.
Madre Selva Biological Station, Loreto, PeruJanuary 13, 2014
Common Forest Anole (Anolis trachyderma)
Last year I saw quite a few sleeping anoles on twigs and leaves at night. But this year I saw at least three or four times as many. I'm not sure if they were that much more plentiful, or if I had just gotten better at spotting them.

Here is a complete list of the herps I saw in the wild on my 2014 MT Amazon Expeditions trip.

Madre Selva Biological Station, Loreto, PeruJanuary 15, 2014
Common Forest Anole (Anolis trachyderma)
Someday I might grow tired of seeing sleeping anoles in the rainforest at night. But today is not that day.
Madre Selva Biological Station, Loreto, PeruJanuary 16, 2014
Common Forest Anole (Anolis trachyderma) Common Forest Anole (Anolis trachyderma)
The sun was out for much of the morning, so some lizards were actually out and about during the day.
Santa Cruz Forest Reserve, Loreto, PeruJanuary 18, 2014
Common Forest Anole (Anolis trachyderma)
The first herp I saw in the Santa Cruz reserve this year, right at the edge of the clearing. The second herp was more exciting.
Madre Selva Biological Station, Loreto, PeruFebruary 3, 2016
Common Forest Anole (Anolis trachyderma)
This one looks like it has just landed on this leaf after jumping from somewhere else, but it had actually been sleeping here. It did wake up and lift its head from all the photo-taking commotion, but otherwise stayed put.

My Travelogues and Trip Lists page includes a complete list of the herps I saw in the wild on my 2016 MT Amazon Expeditions trip.

Santa Cruz Forest Reserve, Loreto, PeruFebruary 8, 2016
Common Forest Anole (Anolis trachyderma)
Here's a youngster carefully clambering over the wet vegetation in search of unsuspecting bugs.
Santa Cruz Forest Reserve, Loreto, PeruFebruary 8, 2016
Common Forest Anole (Anolis trachyderma)
Hold on tight, little sleepy lizard! You wouldn't want to slip and fall and be caught by some passing predator that feasts on clumsy lizards, would you? Based on your tail, it looks like you have narrowly avoided this fate once already.
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