Basiliscus basiliscus Common Basilisk
Some other names for this species:
Brown Basilisk, Jesus Christ Lizard
grounds of Hotel Villa Lapas, Puntarenas province, Costa RicaApril 14, 2001
Common Basilisk (Basiliscus basiliscus) Common Basilisk (Basiliscus basiliscus)
Adult male basilisks have tremendous crests and sails with which to impress female basilisks, and humans (I know I was impressed, anyway). These lizards are extremely agile and speedy, but they're not averse to posing for a photo.

The pair in the second photo are probably adult females, but could be younger males. Basilisks are usually found near water, and these were no exception, basking on the rocks near a stream.

San Pedrillo, Corcovado National Park, Puntarenas province, Costa RicaApril 15, 2001
Common Basilisk (Basiliscus basiliscus) Common Basilisk (Basiliscus basiliscus)
The little tyke in the top photo was perhaps the smallest of the numerous basilisks we saw on this trip, about six inches long or so including its tail.

The bottom photo shows another adult male on a log in the forest, backlit by the late afternoon sun. The full-sized ones like this are perhaps 3 feet long including the tail.

Esquinas Rainforest Lodge, Golfito region, Puntarenas province, Costa RicaSeptember 25, 2001
Common Basilisk (Basiliscus basiliscus)
We caught this large female basilisk sleeping at night on a large leaf. When we took her photo by day, she sat still for about two shots and then bolted into the forest.

Here is a complete list of the species we found on this GreenTracks trip.

Hotel Campestre grounds, El Valle de Antón, Coclé province, PanamaJanuary 9, 2014
Common Basilisk (Basiliscus basiliscus)
An hour or two before dusk, a rain shower had just ended, and I started wandering around the hotel grounds to see what might be seen. This adult female basilisk was taking advantage of the last warmth of the day on top of a thick concrete bridge support.
Hotel Campestre grounds, El Valle de Antón, Coclé province, PanamaJanuary 27, 2016
Common Basilisk (Basiliscus basiliscus)
At night, basilisks find what seem like safe places to sleep. It would be hard (for example) for a snake that is large enough to eat this basilisk to actually climb the thin branches required to reach it. Sleep tight, mamma basilisk!
Trails behind Hotel Campestre, El Valle de Antón, Coclé province, PanamaJanuary 27, 2016
Common Basilisk (Basiliscus basiliscus)
This baby basilisk has the same idea, but did not execute it very well. A minute or two before I took this photo, a false coral snake that was definitely large enough to eat this lizard climbed this vegetation and passed right over the unmoving lizard. Fortunately for the basilisk, false coral snakes are amphibian-eating specialists.
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