Kentropyx pelviceps Forest Whiptail
Madre Selva Biological Station, Loreto, PeruJanuary 14, 2013
Forest Whiptail (Kentropyx pelviceps)
These whiptails were fairly easy to see in and around forest light gaps when the sun was shining, but for the most part they behaved like other whiptails and nervously twitched their way out of sight before a camera could be properly aimed. This large individual bucked the trend by basking in plain sight just off the trail, and actually holding a position for more than five seconds.

Here is a complete list of the herps I saw in the wild on my 2013 MT Amazon Expeditions trip.

Madre Selva Biological Station, Loreto, PeruJanuary 15, 2014
Forest Whiptail (Kentropyx pelviceps)
The vertebral stripe on younger individuals is usually lime-green on the head and shoulders, fading to tan and then brown further back.

Here is a complete list of the herps I saw in the wild on my 2014 MT Amazon Expeditions trip.

Madre Selva Biological Station, Loreto, PeruFebruary 4, 2016
Forest Whiptail (Kentropyx pelviceps)
This one is very young and correspondingly brightly colored. It held this position for some time, which would have been nicer if its snout hadn't been in shadow. If I didn't have a foolish love of natural light, I could have gotten a much better photo by using my flash.

My Travelogues and Trip Lists page includes a complete list of the herps I saw in the wild on my 2016 MT Amazon Expeditions trip.

Santa Cruz Forest Reserve, Loreto, PeruFebruary 8, 2016
Forest Whiptail (Kentropyx pelviceps)
Another very young whiptail, similarly basking. From my pictures on this page, you might think that all these lizards do is relax in the sun. In fact, they are usually scuttling through the leaf litter, but it's very hard to get a decent photograph while they're doing that.
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