Pristimantis ockendeni Carabaya Rain Frog
Madre Selva Biological Station, Loreto, PeruJanuary 15, 2013
Carabaya Rain Frog (Pristimantis ockendeni)
I'm not certain of the identification of this pair of amplexing Pristimantis. My first guess was P. altamazonica, but Dick Bartlett thought they looked more like P. ockendeni, and he certainly knows a lot more than I do about Amazonian herps. Without photos of its belly, thighs, snout, etc., we'll never know for sure.

Here is a complete list of the herps I saw in the wild on my 2013 MT Amazon Expeditions trip.

Santa Cruz Forest Reserve, Loreto, PeruJanuary 19, 2014
Carabaya Rain Frog (Pristimantis ockendeni)
The tubercles on the eyelids are a clue to the identity of these frogs. I guessed that they were Pristimantis ockendeni, and Dick Bartlett thought that sounded right, so that's what I'm calling 'em.
Santa Cruz Forest Reserve, Loreto, PeruJanuary 21, 2014
Carabaya Rain Frog (Pristimantis ockendeni)
Another probable-ockendeni, as probably-confirmed by Dick Bartlett. A pretty little frog!
Madre Selva Biological Station, Loreto, PeruJanuary 31, 2016
Carabaya Rain Frog (Pristimantis ockendeni) Carabaya Rain Frog (Pristimantis ockendeni)
I am not particularly confident that either of these Pristimantis sightings are actually Pristimantis ockendeni, but that's the best ID I could make after studying various websites and books that describe the different candidates. The small tympanum (eardrum) that together with the ridge above it forms a sideways comma shape is one good clue. As always, I would love to be corrected, so please email me if you have thoughts on the subject.

My Travelogues and Trip Lists page includes a complete list of the herps I saw in the wild on my 2016 MT Amazon Expeditions trip.

Madre Selva Biological Station, Loreto, PeruFebruary 3, 2016
Carabaya Rain Frog (Pristimantis ockendeni)
This frog meets has many of the characteristics of Pristimantis ockendeni, including its snout shape, tympanum size, skin texture, and heel tubercles. But the proportions seem quite different than most of the other frogs that I have at least tentatively identified as P. ockendeni. I am guessing that this is a very young individual, that still retains the relatively large head and small legs of froggy youth.
Madre Selva Biological Station, Loreto, PeruFebruary 4, 2016
Carabaya Rain Frog (Pristimantis ockendeni)
This one has adult-frog proportions, and it was definitely larger than the tiny little one from the previous night. It seems like a very good match for my understanding of Pristimantis ockendeni, but my understanding could be missing some critical pieces.
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