Species:

Leptodactylus pentadactylus

Smokey Jungle Frog

Some other names for this species:

Smoky Jungle Frog, Smokey Frog, South American Bullfrog

Notes on this species:
Leptodactylus pentadactylus was split in 2005. The ones in Costa Rica are now classified as L. savagei.
Madre Selva Biological Station, Loreto, Peru
Smokey Jungle Frog (Leptodactylus pentadactylus)
The first Smokey Jungle Frog I saw in Peru was this small one, about three inches long. At first I thought it might be Leptodactylus knudseni, but its dorsolateral ridges extend all the way back (past the sacrum, to the groin), which is a characteristic that distinguishes these two species.

Here is a complete list of the herps I saw in the wild on my 2013 MT Amazon Expeditions trip.

Santa Cruz Forest Reserve, Loreto, Peru
Smokey Jungle Frog (Leptodactylus pentadactylus)
This was a large individual. The eyes of these nocturnal frogs have a light-catching property that causes them to often reflect bright red when photographed with a flash.
Santa Cruz Forest Reserve, Loreto, Peru
Smokey Jungle Frog (Leptodactylus pentadactylus)
On our last night at Santa Cruz, Mitch Berk and I saw this monster frog, no doubt the largest frog I've ever seen in the wild. I estimated it at the size of a bowling ball, though it's not impossible that this was a slight exaggeration. When we got back to camp, I was telling Marisa Ai Ishimatsu that I had seen the largest Smokey Jungle Frog that anyone had ever seen, and no doubt the largest one that had ever existed. And did she believe me? No! She dared to argue, claiming that *she* had seen one that very evening so huge that it was impossible that mine was bigger. I bumped up my claims for emphasis, saying that it had been at least the size of a Volkswagen Beetle, but still she would not do the honorable thing and simply agree that the frog I had seen was clearly larger than the one she had seen.

Then she paused and asked "Was your frog in that big pile of broken-up vegetation right near the beginning of the Viper Trail?". Sure enough, we had each seen the same frog.

Santa Cruz Forest Reserve, Loreto, Peru
Smokey Jungle Frog (Leptodactylus pentadactylus)
It turns out that if you take a flash photo from directly in front of a big fat Smokey Jungle Frog, you don't get the evil-looking glowing red eyes.

Here is a complete list of the herps I saw in the wild on my 2014 MT Amazon Expeditions trip.

Santa Cruz Forest Reserve, Loreto, Peru
Smokey Jungle Frog (Leptodactylus pentadactylus)
No doubt thinking devilish thoughts.